Manufacture Your Career

Click here to register for Manufacture Your Career. 

For Further Information Contact:

Beth Boggs, M.Ed Career & Transfer Counselor 276-523-2400 Ext. 640324

Career Services

Holton Hall – Student Services Suite Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday 3441 Mountain Empire Road Big Stone Gap, VA 24219

Upcoming Events:

No Events

MECC’s Career Services provides current online and onsite services for exploring and planning careers, acquiring employability skills, and accessing job search resources to students, alumni, and faculty as well as to employers and the community.

Employment Opportunities

Career Assessment

Job Preparation Skills

It is important that you fully answer questions on an application. Complete the application in reverse chronological order (education and experience). You want the employer to see the most recent information first. Use action verbs. Focus on the skills you gained rather than routine responsibilities

A resume is a document designed to introduce your professional self to your employer. Your resume should be tailored to each individual position you apply for. By reviewing your resume, the employer can evaluate your organizational skills, review your written communication, and gauge your attention to detail. Be sure to use an easy to read and unique format and utilize action verbs to describe your duties.

Key Action Verbs

Mountain Empire Community College Career Services

Achieved Acted Activated Adapted
Administered Advised Aided Allocated
Analyzed Applied Appraised Approved
Arranged Assembled Assessed Assigned
Authored Audited Balanced Billed
Brought Budgeted Calculated Carried out
Chaired Clarified Classified Coached
Collected Communicated Compiled Completed
Computed Conceived Conceptualized Conducted
Contracted Consolidated Controlled Convinced
Corresponded Counseled Created Critiqued
Dealt Decided Defined Delegated
Demonstrated Described Designed Determined
Diagnosed Directed Dispatched Devised
Earned Edited Educated Eliminated
Enabled Encouraged Enforced Enhanced
Enlisted Established Estimated Evaluated
Executed Explained Expanded Expedited
Fabricated Facilitated Familiarized Fashioned
Forecasted Formed Formulated Fostered
Gathered Generated Guided Handled
Identified Illustrated Implemented Improved
Increased Influenced Informed Initiated
Inspected Inspired Instructed Interpreted
Introduced Invented Investigated Launched
Led Listed Listened Maintained
Marketed Mastered Mediated Moderated
Monitored Motivated Negotiated Observed
Organized Outlined Overhauled Oversaw
Performed Persuaded Pioneered Planned
Persuaded Received Recommended Reconciled
Presented Prioritized Produced Projected
Provided Published Publicized Purchased
Processed Programmed Promoted Recorded
Reevaluated Referred Rehabilitated Rejected
Repaired Represented Reorganized Reported
Resolved Restored Retrieved Reunited
Revised Revitalized Scheduled Screened
Served Set Goals Set up Sold
Spearheaded Specified Spoke Stimulated
Strengthened Structured Summarized Supervised
Surpassed Surveyed Tabulated Targeted
Teamed with Tested Trained Tripled
Translated Upgraded Updated United
Validated Verified Volunteered Wrote

Think of a cover letter as a written introduction. A cover letter should be written as a formal letter including return address, date, address of employer and greeting. Following your paragraphs, be sure to end the letter with a salutation.

Opening Paragraph: State why you are writing how you learned of the position and basic information about you.

Consider answering the following questions in your introduction paragraph:

  • What position are you applying for?
  • What makes you most qualified for the position?
  • Why are you a good fit for the position?
  • What makes you interested in the position/career field?
  • How will this position help you reach your career goals?

Second Paragraph: Tell WHY You are interested in the employer or type of work the employer does. Demonstrate that you know enough about the employer or position to relate your background to the employer or position.

Consider answering these questions within the body of your cover letter:

  • Why are you interested in the position?
  • Why will you be successful in the position?
  • What makes you interested in the position/career field?
  • How will this position help you reach your career goals?

OR

  • Why are you interested in this company?
  • How do the values/mission of this company align with your values/mission?
  • What do you know about this company that makes you interested in working here?
  • What is the reputation of the company and does that impact your interest in working here?

OR

  • Use a combination of the above questions to write the body of your cover letter. Use this paragraph to explain in more detail relevant information from your resume. Be specific. Do not just state that you are qualified but tell the potential employer WHY you are qualified.

Third Paragraph: Indicate that you welcome the opportunity to interview for the position or speak with the employer. State that you would be glad to provide any additional information needed. Thank the employer for their time and consideration.

Keep in mind a paragraph is 5 sentences. All addresses should be single spaced. You can match the heading of your Resume to the top of your Cover Letter. Again, the Cover Letter will be used to review your written communication skills; be sure to proofread!

Being prepared for an interview will give you a better chance of being selected for the position. Before going into an interview be sure to review the job posting that you have applied for as well as the resume and cover letter you submitted. This will refresh your memory on the requirements of the position as well as how you meet those requirements before going in. Focus on your professional self when interviewing, this is the time to be “selfish” and speak only of yourself, rather than your family. If the employer asks that you describe yourself, focus on your education, the skills you have gained through employment, volunteering or classroom experiences, future degrees you hope to pursue, accomplishments you have made, certifications you have gained, etc. Be confident. Be sure to have good questions to ask the employer. For example? –

  • What is the projected start date for the position?
  • What are the day-to-day responsibilities of this position?

Following an interview, always send a Thank You Letter to the employer. This will allow you the opportunity to follow up on any information you want to reiterate as well as thank them for their time once again. Sending a Thank You Letter can make you stand out above the other applicants.